Posts Tagged ‘upstream’

Warning! Smart Big Data Analytics People in the Room

David Holmes

David Holmes

CTO & Chief Industry Executive -Global Oil & Gas Program at EMC
As Chief Industry Executive for the Global Oil & Gas Program, David is responsible for developing EMC’s Oil and Gas upstream solutions and product positioning strategy in conjunction with the Brazil Research Center and Global CTO Organization. Works with partners and clients to identify oil and gas business needs and designs solution architectures to support these opportunities. David has served on a number of industry committees including the European ECIM organization and SPE’s “Petabytes in Asset Management.” He has delivered numerous technical papers at conferences around the world and holds a patent for his work on the remote visualization of geotechnical applications.
David Holmes
David Holmes

Latest posts by David Holmes (see all)

Recently, I attended the Society of Petroleum Engineers Forum event on Big Data Analytics in Dubai, UAE. Forum events are industry led and have no sponsorship, they bring together 50 thought leaders from vendors, oilfield service companies and oil companies to look at the challenges and opportunities related to a particular topic. It’s pretty exhausting being in a room full of smart people for four days, and my brain definitely needed the weekend to cool down.

But over four days of workshops and discussions, a clear theme was identified: The lack of an integrated approach to big data analytics. Companies complained of a lack of joined up thinking and of business stakeholders investing in bespoke point solutions that only increased the complexity and challenges of delivering future solutions. It was pretty cool to be able to talk holistically about a range of solutions that addressed infrastructure, data integration, data quality, data analytics, data persistence, the role of the cloud and the third platform as well as some top notch PAAS and agile development smarts. EMC has all of these, available (as is our want), either piece by piece or as a fully engineered solution wrapped up in the ribbon that is the EMC Federation Business Data Lake.

However, the implementation of an integrated big data analytics capability across the enterprise has consequences beyond those I had anticipated and at all levels of the business:

smart_people_in_room

  1. Strategically – One attendee talked of his frustration at the lack of consistent adoption of big data analytics to support portfolio management. A comprehensive approach would allow companies to dynamically manage their portfolio of assets supporting the regular review of business strategy based on changing market conditions. Optimizing portfolio management has an ROI running into the hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars. One speaker talked passionately about how “bias is the mortal enemy of upstream performance.” Big data analytics should help remove bias and support rational decision making.
  2. Operationally – Many companies are introducing big data analytics tools to address particular workflows or challenges. While these solutions might address particular high value problems, often they are not being implemented in a joined up way. Almost all of the attendees supported having a centralized big data analytics function with data engineers embedded into asset teams but working as part of a centralized group working on a common set of platforms.
  3. Tactically – There was quite a lot of talk as to how big data analytics could be commoditized to support smaller opportunities. One example given was that maybe you could save $40,000 a year through analyzing water purchasing contracts and linking this to your reservoir model. But that only makes sense if you could run a project to implement such a solution for less than $60K (assume a 100% ROI over 3 years and an 18 month payback). The only way you can support small projects is to have all of the infrastructure and resources in place already.

Of course a lot of talk at the event was around the oil price. But did this put people off looking at technology projects? Not really, as one person put it – “Oil companies of all sizes are facing an existential crisis, the company that is first to effectively leverage big data analytics across their enterprise will have a material competitive advantage over its competitors. Then everyone else will have to follow suit.”

Technology and Business Alignment in E&P

Tim Voyt

Tim Voyt

Mr. Timothy Voyt has more than 20 years of experience in providing technology and services to the Energy industry, both domestically and internationally. Mr. Voyt joined EMC in April of 2005 as the Oil and Gas Director and has global responsibility for all aspects of the EMC’s Oil and Gas Vertical Program. Prior to joining EMC, Mr. Voyt served as Executive Vice President of Operations for Tobin International where he had operational accountability for all of Tobin's Data Products, Software Products, Services, and International Operating Divisions. Mr. Voyt also spent more than 9 years with Landmark Graphics building and managing Landmark’s pre- and post sales services businesses within North America, Europe, Africa, and Russia.
Tim Voyt

Latest posts by Tim Voyt (see all)

[show_avatar email=tim.voyt@emc.com align=left avatar_size=30]

One of the best parts of my job is that I get to work with E&P customers and partners in who are working to solve really interesting business challenges. What’s even more interesting to me is that more and more of these business challenges have an information technology component that will positively or negatively impact the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the ultimate solution. The intersection and (more often than not) inter-dependence of technology within business operations provides fertile ground for technology companies such as EMC to engage with our clients in line of business discussions rather than just traditional IT dialogues. As such, our customers and partners are looking to EMC to take an active role in innovative research and development projects that incorporate business workflows, process improvement efforts, application development, underlying infrastructure stacks, and data themes. It is good to see IT professionals having a “seat at the table” and being able to contribute real value when it comes to solving business challenges. The realization that IT can help create a business advantage rather than (more…)

Private Cloud for Upstream Oil and Gas – Realizing the PetroCloud

Larry Kaufman

Larry Kaufman

Larry Kaufman, Chief Industry Architect for EMC’s Global Energy Program, is responsible for developing and delivering complex, integrated solutions based on EMC and partner technologies that solve challenging business problems and workflows within the Oil and Gas Industry. Larry began his career in Oil and Gas as an open-hole wireline engineer. Larry also spent 16 years with Landmark Graphics and Halliburton in various sales, technology development and management roles as Landmark grew from 60 employees to over 2000 before being acquired by Halliburton. Larry has a Bachelors of Science in Electrical Engineering and has over 24 years of experience developing and deploying information technology solutions serving the upstream oil and gas industry. Outside of work Larry enjoys wood working and spending time at the lake with family and friends.

[show_avatar email=larry.kaufman@emc.com align=left avatar_size=30]It’s hard to believe that just 25 years ago seismic interpretation was a manual process.  Rather than workstations, provisioning a geoscientist meant providing a solid drafting table, good light, plenty of colored pencils, and paper weights. The process of developing a prospect could take months or even years.  The advent of computer-based systems was a boon to the industry and has drastically reduced workflow times and the risk of drilling dry holes.  The infrastructure evolved from a large, expensive turnkey system shared by many geoscientists, to large, isolated, individual workstations.  For data backup, disk was expensive and tape ubiquitous.

The client/server model coupled with shared storage decreased costs, reduced the use of tape, and streamlined access to data.  Thin client technology, which puts minimal hardware on the desktop and relies on the computing power of the server, was yet another innovation used to reduce costs.  One could argue that today we have come back to thick clients with “fat” (large memory, multiple CPUs) Windows and Linux based workstation applications.

A new IT revolution is upon us – the shift towards cloud computing. The private cloud, deployed on (more…)

Does Technology Help You Keep Up With Your Workload?

Peter Hodge

Peter Hodge

As Oil & Gas Solutions Lead within EMC’s Engineering Solutions Group, Peter is responsible for the development of solutions that utilize EMC and our partners’ technologies to address the needs of the oil and gas market. Peter has been with EMC for 14 years in a variety of capacities, including Oil & Gas Industry Marketing. Peter had dreamed of making a career in seismology and earthquake prediction after earning a bachelors degree in geophysics, but was lured away by the Oil & Gas industry and spent several years at Mobil Oil as a geophysicist, Green Mountain Geophysics leading marketing and sales, then Digital Equipment Corporation in various marketing and partner management roles focused on oil and gas before finally landing at EMC. Peter is fascinated by the Oil & Gas industry and finds the technological advances he has witnessed over his career to be quite remarkable. Next to his family, Peter's passion is the outdoors, in all seasons, with emphasis on mountain climbing.
Peter Hodge

Latest posts by Peter Hodge (see all)

[show_avatar email=peter.hodge@emc.com align=left avatar_size=30]My cohorts and I are off to SEG next week to meet with customers, partners, friends and colleagues.  We will hear and tell lots of stories during our visits.  Whether at the conference, the exhibit floor, over lunch or drinks, when conversation turns to reminiscing about how it used to be for geoscientists, we will reflect on the amazing and exciting changes we have witnessed in our careers.  For the most part, life for a geoscientist is better. I remember my early days as a geophysicist and the time-consuming chores of working with paper sections, measuring travel times with a ruler, transferring times to paper and drawing a contour map.  Preparing for a prospect review meant the office was a busy place nights and weekends.

The explosion of computer technology has streamlined the process tremendously and allowed for orders of magnitude more data to be interpreted and analyzed in far less time.  Yet, despite the exhilarating changes technology has provided, (more…)

EMC Isilon PetroVault: Your Next Big Data Reservoir

Larry Kaufman

Larry Kaufman

Larry Kaufman, Chief Industry Architect for EMC’s Global Energy Program, is responsible for developing and delivering complex, integrated solutions based on EMC and partner technologies that solve challenging business problems and workflows within the Oil and Gas Industry. Larry began his career in Oil and Gas as an open-hole wireline engineer. Larry also spent 16 years with Landmark Graphics and Halliburton in various sales, technology development and management roles as Landmark grew from 60 employees to over 2000 before being acquired by Halliburton. Larry has a Bachelors of Science in Electrical Engineering and has over 24 years of experience developing and deploying information technology solutions serving the upstream oil and gas industry. Outside of work Larry enjoys wood working and spending time at the lake with family and friends.

[show_avatar email=larry.kaufman@emc.com align=left avatar_size=30]“I don’t care if the storage is full. I need my interpretation projects to stay online…..forever.”

I am sure that IT managers and data administrators managing upstream oil and gas interpretation environments hear this all the time from Geoscientists. The folklore that drives this attitude from the geoscientists says that many have had bad experiences with getting data back once it has been moved off primary storage to tape. Either it takes too long to get the data restored from tape, if the tape can be found, or the full “project” structure of the data might have been compromised in the standard file system type backup to tape and intellectual property has been lost.

From the IT management side the typical conundrum is, “My storage is full, again. My budget has been cut. Do I really need to buy more? If so, how much?”

The reality of the situation is that (more…)